Seminars (2013-2014)

 
Doing Comparative Education
28 March 2014, 15.00-16.30
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
The idea of this discussion is to open up the range of interests issues and purposes relating this component of the family of Educational Studies. Kenneth King and Colin Brock will make brief presentations on International Educational Development and Comparative Education respectively, and then open the discussion to everyone present. Both strands of educational studies have their distinctive histories but have yet to face up to the problems that are developing around the world in the twenty-first century. The University of Malaya is already on the way with its creation of the Centre for Research in International and Comparative Education (CRICE) and all set to play its part. This Seminar is mainly to discuss and put forward views as to the priorities that should be at the forefront of this field in the next decade and beyond.

 

Speakers

 

Panel discussion on 'Are Multinational and International Organisations and Bilateral Aid Agencies Succeeding in Addressing the Global Education Needs of the Twenty-First Century?'
26 March 2014, 14.30 - 16.30 
Auditorium, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
It is clear from highly credible and respected research that the twenty-first century will present new, massive and potentially devastating challenges to human survival and sustainable development. The agencies concerned are directly or indirectly the international response to the post second word war phase of new international co-operation. To what extent have they succeeded, especially with regard to education in all its forms and operations? Are their structures, modes of financing and operation fit for purpose for the coming decades? Do they need radically new educational dimensions, objectives and modes of operation to be able to meet and overcome the problems of the twenty-first century?
  

 

Guest Panellists

 

Keeping Education Ahead in the Post-MDG Olympics?
Kenneth King, University of Edinburgh
26 March 2014, 10.00 - 11.30 
Bilik Cemerlang, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
In 2014, the post-MDG marathon enters its last lap. There are just 19 months to go before the September 2015 finishing line. So far, Education has maintained a good position in the global race to be included in the next development agenda. It has always been the first priority out of sixteen others in the UNs Citizen Survey, MyWorld2015. In the UN Secretary General's High Level Panel Report on the Post-2015 Development Agenda, Education has been selected as one of the eleven Illustrative Goals. Education has also gained visibility through the Secretary General's Education First Initiative. Most recently, in the Education for All Global Monitoring Report 2013/14, a whole chapter is dedicated to arguing that 'Education's unique power should secure it a central place in the post-2015 development framework' (p.185).
What next? Where will Education be positioned in the crucial report of the UNs Open Working Group, due to be released in a few months? What role will emerging economies, from China to India, and Mexico to Malaysia, play in the final positioning of Education in the next global agenda? And how will that agenda relate to the parallel agendas of many national governments? These are some of the issues to be debated in the CRICE Seminar.

About the Speaker

Kenneth King was the Director of the Centre of African Studies and Professor of International and Comparative Education at the University of Edinburgh till September 2005. He is now Emeritus Professor in the School of Education and also School of Social and Political Studies. His research interests have focused on the politics and history of international education, skills development in both the formal and informal sectors of the economy, and aid policy. Currently he is researching China's higher education cooperation with Africa, as well as the Post-2015 Education and Training agenda.
For over 25 years he has been editor of the aid and international education policy bulletin, called NORRAG News (freely available at www.norrag.org). The Fundamental in Educational Planning, No 94, on Planning Technical and Vocational Skills Development (jointly with Robert Palmer) was published by IIEP, UNESCO in September 2010. In 2013, he published China's Aid and Soft Power in Africa: the Case of Education and Training (James Currey).

 

 

Global Curricular Challenges for the Twenty-First Century  
Colin Brock, University of Oxford
25 March 2014, 15.00 - 16.30 
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
The twenty-first century will provide unprecedented challenges to the human species. It is clear that for many of the world's people major catastophies lie ahead in many fields: environmental, economic, clean water supply supply for massively increased numbers of people, increased human conflict and climate change. Education is almost the only hope, but not the education we have now in all its forms: formal, non-formal and informal. Radical changes are needed, especially in the school curriculum, a feature of education that has been slow to change, and therefore a reactionary factor. This presentation will consider the historical curricular legacy for schools and suggest radical innovations in both content and delivery that may enable education to make a contribution to sustaining the human species.

About the Speaker

Colin Brock is Senior Research Fellow in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford. Previously he has worked at the universities of Reading, Leeds and Hull an also around the world for all the main international development agencies and major NGOs. From 2005 to 2012 he was UNESCO Chair in Education as a Humanitarian Response at Oxford. his involved field projects in Thailand (Karen refugees from Myanmar); Sierra Leone (post-civil war conflict issues); Ukraine (orphans and street children) and London (refugee education). The final impact of the UNESCO Chair is a series of 15 books on Education as a Humanitarian Response (9 published 3 in printing). He is also series editor of Education Around the World (19 volumes, 5 published 7 in printing) the first ever global series in comparative and international education. Dr Brock is an Adjunct Professor of Education at the University of Malaya, working with the Centre for Research in International and Comparative Education (CRICE). He has supervised over 70 successful doctoral students and hundreds of masters dissertations, authored or edited over 30 books and published about 150 articles in journals and chapters in books.

 

 

Contemporary Challenges for Education in Conflict Affected Countries 
Alan Smith, University of Ulster
25 March 2014, 10.00 - 11.30 
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
The importance of education to human development is insufficient spending as a percentage of GNP or inequitable distribution of funding and resources. Significant barriers to education, particularly within as, by its central place in achieving the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) and reflected in the global initiative Education for All (EFA) aimed at securing primary education for all children by the year 2015. There are many impediments to the achievement of universal primary education. These include lack of priority to education on the part of national governments such emphasised low income countries, include poverty, child labour, distance from school, unequal access due to gender or cultural factors and the existence of conflict. Although the number of out-of-school primary-age children in the world has fallen in recent years, there has been little improvement in conflict affected countries. These countries are home to half of all children out of school (currently 28.5 million out of 57 million children), yet they receive less than one-fifth of education aid. This paper draws on research for the 2011 EFA Global Monitoring Report to highlight a number of significant challenges for education in these countries and the contribution that education might make to longer term peacebuilding.

About the Speaker

Alan Smith holds the UNESCO Chair in Education for Pluralism, Human Rights and Democracy at the University of Ulster, Northern Ireland. He has been a British Council visiting fellow to Nigeria and Indonesia, and a visiting research fellow to the Hong Kong Institute of Education and the University of Amsterdam. An influential report for DFID on ‘Education, Conflict and International Development’ led to research for DFID, GiZ, International Alert, Save The Children, UNESCO, UNICEF and the World Bank in Bosnia, Serbia, Sri Lanka, Nepal, Burundi, Sierra Leone, Uganda and Zimbabwe. He was a contributing author and adviser to the Education for All, Global Monitoring Report (2011) based on his work related to education, conflict and international development. He is currently a technical advisor to the UNICEF Peacebuilding, Education and Advocacy programme, a €150 million initiative funded by the Government of the Netherlands involving 14 conflict affected countries over a four-year period (2012-15).

 

 

 

The High- Flying Academic Department- A Dream too Far?
Awang Bulgiba Awang Mahmud, University of Malaya
20 May 2014, 14.30 - 16.00 
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
The Department of Social and Preventive Medicine (also known as the SPM Department) in the University of Malaya has been at the forefront of higher public health education in Malaysia. The creation of the country's first and still most respected public health degree programme as well as a thriving research and community involvement culture in the SPM Department has elevated it to the School of Public Health built upon solid foundations. World class institutions should support the ideals of service in all its aspects-research, teaching, community involvement, and communication. All of which require the combined resources and dedication of each and every member of an institutions. This talk will focus on the emerging needs of universities and how model adopted by SPM can be applicable to other departments of higher education institutions to ensure maintenance of competitiveness in the changing landscape of higher education.

About the Speaker 

The first Malaysian doctor to gain a PhD in Health Informatics, Awang Bulgiba is also the first public health physician in Malaysia to be awarded four fellowships-- Fellow of Faculty of Public Health, Fellow of Public Health Medicine Malaysia, and Fellow of Academy of Medicine Malaysia, Fellow of Academy of Science). Awang Bulgiba is Professor at the Faculty of Medicine and is currently Deputy Vice-Chancellor (Research and Innovation) of the University of Malaya. He part of the editorial boards of the Asia Pacific Journal of Public Health (APJPH) and Malaysian Orthopaedic Journal (MOJ), and an international advisory board member of the Journal of Experimental and Clinical Medicine (JECM). He has also been an external examiner and assessor for several universities, was the founding Head of the Julius Centre UM (2008-2012), Chair for the University of Malaya Wellness Programme (2007-2009) and the Malaysian coordinator for the Asia-Europe Clinical Epidemiology & Evidence-Based Medicine Programme (2007-2010). In 2008 and 2012, respectively, Awang was the Organising Chair for the 40th Asia-Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health (APACPH) Conference and the 1st Asia Pacific Clinical Epidemiology and Evidence-Based Medicine (APCEEBM) Conference. He was recently elected as President of Asia-Pacific Academic Consortium for Public Health (APACPH) KL, an NGO dedicated to public health. He has published more than 70 peer-reviewed journal articles and is currently Principal Investigator for a few research projects, one of which is the RM3.27 million (US$1,000,000) Spatio-Temporal Modelling and Meta-analysis (STeMM) MOHE-UM HIR Project.

 

 

New Comparative and International Directions for the History of Education
Gary McCulloch, Institute of Education, University of London
11 March 2014, 10.00 - 11.30 
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
This talk explores new directions in the history of education, looking forward to the future of the international field of research, and to analyse fresh trends. The history of education is a contested site in terms of its identity, rationale and strategy, but it is also able to draw on and engage with developments in education, history and the social sciences. Latterly these connections have helped to encourage further engagement with theoretical and methodological approaches across these areas. In relation to comparative and international perspectives, the paper surveys how the field has tended to favour national and single-site studies but is giving increasing attention to trends in internationalisation, globalisation, transnationalism, postcolonial approaches, and the experiences of colonised and indigenous peoples.

About the Speaker 

Gary McCulloch is the Brian Simon Professor of the History of Education at the Institute of Education, University of London. His recent publications include The Struggle for the History of Education (Routledge 2011) and (with Tom Woodin and Steven Cowan) Secondary Education and the Raising of the School Leaving Age: Coming of Age? (Palgrave Macmillan 2013). He is a former president of the UK History of Education Society and a previous Editor of the International Journal History of Education. He is currently the lead organiser for the 2014 annual conference of the International Standing Conference for the History of Education (ISCHE) to be held at the Institute of Education London in July 2014 on the theme of ‘Education, War and Peace’, and is Joint Editor of the British Journal of Educational Studies.

 

 

 
The Role of the University in the Transformation Process of Ecuador
Lourdes Puma Puma, Embassy of Ecuador
11 December 10.00-11.30
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya

 

A profound political, economic, social and cultural change has been implemented in Ecuador since 2007, in line with the aim to create an inclusive and just society which has its people and its relations with the environment at the center of the country's policies and actions. This has in effect led to the changes set in the 2008 Ecuadorian Constitution which, for the first time, recognises the legally enforcing 'ecosystems' rights.
This talk will focus on three aspects: (a) a general vision of the new development model based on a series of principles of the National Plan for Living Well, which emphasises the role of education and the creation of incentives to develop the full potential of human capacities, through good health and appropriate access to knowledge, among others; (b) the Ecuadorian Higher Education Reform development plan, its legal framework, main objectives and achievements, and (c) possible areas of cooperation with Malaysian universities through the two projects implemented by the Ecuadorian Government, the YACHAY City of Knowledge and the PROMETEO programme that underline joint international academic exchange of teachers and researchers.
About the Speaker

Lourdes Puma Puma is a career diplomat with 30 years of experience. She studied law, sociology and political science and is currently the Ambassador of Ecuador to Malaysia. She is also accredited as the Nonresident Ambassador to the Socialist Republic of Vietnam, Kingdom of Thailand, Democratic Republic of Laos and Kingdom of Cambodia. Before coming to Malaysia in 2009, she was Director General for Multilateral Affairs and International Organizations (2006-2009), Director General for Technical and Economic Cooperation and Director General for International projects (1998/2001), in the Ministry for Foreign Affairs in Quito, Ecuador. Ambassador Puma has represented her country in diverse capacities in Chile, Brazil, Belgium and Sweden, and has also represented Ecuador in different international conferences and forums. She has been member of the Confidentiality Commission for the International Organisation for Chemical Weapons, from 2006 to 2013, and member of the Non- Permanent Specialized Committees (CENPES) of the Organisation of American States (2000-2001).
 

 

Undertaking a Research Degree (for Research Students)

Colin Brock, University of Oxford
29 November 2013
Pengurusan Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya

 

Around the world there is a massive increase in graduate research and the related issue of the mutual recognition of qualifications. This means that standards need to rise in most countries, whether in terms of masters dissertations, masters theses and PhD theses. In the field of educational studies and allied social science disciplines there is a growing need to undertake research that helps education to focus more effectively on the massive social and environmental problems that we must face in the twenty-first century. The workshop will include: selecting an appropriate theme; respective roles of student and supervisor(s); checking for originality; coping with multidisciplinarity; formulating a research proposal; identifying key research questions and appropriate research methods; planning fieldwork and data collection and analysis; writing up; preparing for the examination; possibilities for publication. The workshop will be as practical and participatory as possible.

About the Speaker

Colin Brock is Senior Research Fellow in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford. Previously he has worked at the universities of Reading , Leeds and Hull an also around the world for all the main international development agencies and major NGOs. From 2005 to 2012 he was UNESCO Chair in Education as a Humanitarian Response at Oxford. his involved field projects in Thailand ( Karen refugees from Myanmar); Sierra Leone ( post-civil war conflict issues ); Ukraine ( orphans and street children) and London ( refugee education). The final impact of the UNESCO Chair is a series of 15 books on Education as a Humanitarian Response (9 published 3 in printing). He is also series editor of Education Around the World (19 volumes, 5 published 7 in printing) the first ever global series in comparative and international education. Dr Brock is an Adjunct Professor of Education at the University of Malaya, working with the Centre for Research in International and Comparative Education (CRICE). He has supervised over 70 successful doctoral students and hundreds of masters dissertations, authored or edited over 30 books and published about 150 articles in journals and chapters in books.

 

 

Supervising Higher Degree Research: for Academic Staff

Colin Brock, University of Oxford
28 November 2013
Pengurusan Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya

 

Outside the natural and the applied sciences, higher degree research is mostly carried out on an individual basis, as in educational studies and allied social science disciplines. It involves a close and sustained relationship between student and supervisor(s). Poor supervision can destroy a student's chances of success. The supervisor's role is a skill that needs to be learnt and not a minor duty among others. Issues to be addressed include: the selection of students and supervisors; the identification of a viable research topic; the formulation of a key research question and subsidiaries; reviewing relevant literature; planning empirical research methods; selecting viable field research locations and appropriate scales; piloting and revising; writing up and editing; selecting examiners; rehearsing the viva; dealing with corrections.The supervisor needs to be a 'critical friend' in every one of these stages and give as much time as is necessary.

Anout the Speaker

Colin Brock is Senior Research Fellow in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford. Previously he has worked at the universities of Reading , Leeds and Hull an also around the world for all the main international development agencies and major NGOs. From 2005 to 2012 he was UNESCO Chair in Education as a Humanitarian Response at Oxford. his involved field projects in Thailand ( Karen refugees from Myanmar); Sierra Leone ( post-civil war conflict issues ); Ukraine ( orphans and street children) and London ( refugee education). The final impact of the UNESCO Chair is a series of 15 books on Education as a Humanitarian Response (9 published 3 in printing). He is also series editor of Education Around the World (19 volumes, 5 published 7 in printing) the first ever global series in comparative and international education. Dr Brock is an Adjunct Professor of Education at the University of Malaya, working with the Centre for Research in International and Comparative Education (CRICE). He has supervised over 70 successful doctoral students and hundreds of masters dissertations, authored or edited over 30 books and published about 150 articles in journals and chapters in books.

 

 

Education for Survival: the Next Frontier

Colin Brock, University of Oxford
27 November 2013, 10.00 - 11.30 
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya

 

The contention of this presentation is that formal systems of education throughout the world are not fit for purpose. Indeed they are limiting the potentially vital contribution of education towards meeting the challenges to humanity and the environment that will massively increase during the twenty-first century. These current and near conformist systems have developed from classical and medieval Europe, and disseminated through
colonialism and globalisation through the agencies of , first the Christian Church, and then industrialisation, modernisation and competitive nationalism. Richard Aldrich, the notable historian of education has identified two purposive stages to date: 'education for salvation', and 'education for development'. He argues that we urgently need to change direction to 'education for survival' before it is too late. This presentation will discuss what this means for schools, universities and communities as the population explosion, pressure on natural resources and global warming threaten to overtake us.

About the Speaker

Colin Brock is Senior Research Fellow in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford. Previously he has worked at the universities of Reading , Leeds and Hull an also around the world for all the main international development agencies and major NGOs. From 2005 to 2012 he was UNESCO Chair in Education as a Humanitarian Response at Oxford. his involved field projects in Thailand ( Karen refugees from Myanmar); Sierra Leone ( post-civil war conflict issues ); Ukraine ( orphans and street children) and London ( refugee education). The final impact of the UNESCO Chair is a series of 15 books on Education as a Humanitarian Response (9 published 3 in printing). He is also series editor of Education Around the World (19 volumes, 5 published 7 in printing) the first ever global series in comparative and international education. Dr Brock is an Adjunct Professor of Education at the University of Malaya, working with the Centre for Research in International and Comparative Education (CRICE). He has supervised over 70 successful doctoral students and hundreds of masters dissertations, authored or edited over 30 books and published about 150 articles in journals and chapters in books.
 

 

Education's Place on the Development Agenda Post 2015

Simon McGrath, University of Nottingham, UK 
23 November 2013, 10.00 - 11.30 
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya

 

Education appears to have a secure place in the proposed post-2015 development settlement, having been accorded one of the 12 goals of the United Nations High Level Panel. However, what is the understanding of education and its role in development that is operating in this and other post-2015 policy debates? What perspectives on and sectors of education are likely to be privileged, and which downplayed? What are the likely implications for education as a practice and as an academic discipline?

About the Speaker

Simon McGrath is Professor in International Education and Development at the University of Nottingham and former Editor-in-Chief of the International Journal of Educational Development. He has published on a number of aspects of education - development links, including vocational education and training systems in Africa, the skills development processes of micro and small enterprises, and the role of aid in shaping education. He advises a number of government departments (most notably in South Africa) and international agencies and recently co-authored UNESCO's World TVET Report.

 

 

 

 

The University, Science and Internationalisation

Rosalia Arteaga Serrano
12 November 2013, 10.00 - 11.30 
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya

 

It is necessary to have a prospective vision of the development of the university. Since its origins, the university has shown a need for universalization and knowledge generation. The requisites of the global world make the university more relevant through the incorporation of the sciences and research, among others, as also highlighted in the rise of the knowledge-based economy. The university’s function as a generator of answers and solutions from its long-established responsibility to human development, and more recently pertaining to sustainable development, requires a renewal of faith in the university as well as in the educative process. This lecture will highlight the significance of the university and the need to maintain a humanitarian response in facing such challenges.
About the Speaker

Rosalia Arteaga Serrano was former President and Vice President of the Republic of Ecuador (1996-1998). She was also Minister of Education, Culture and Sports, Deputy Minister of Culture, and Secretary General of the Amazon Cooperation Treaty Organization (2004 – 2007). Dr Arteaga holds a doctorate in Jurisprudence and a master’s degree in Anthropology. She is currently the President of the Latin American Foundation for the Integration and Development (FIDAL) and a recipient of the grand cross of the Order of Rio Branco from the Government of Brasil
 

 

 

 

Politics and Education

T. Marimuthu, Asia e University 
22 May 2013, 10.00 - 11.30 
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
This lecture will explore the symbiotic relationship between politics and education, where each influences the fate of the other. Education is encapsulated in the political environment of the nation state. Each nation state from liberal democracies to totalitarian systems uses education as one of their state apparatus to transmit their political ideologies. In discussing the nexus between education and politics, the various educational polities in Malaysia will be critically examined, with particular reference to the various educational acts starting from the Razak Report of 1956 till the Education Act of 1996. The social, economic and political factors leading to the educational policies will be discussed. The current educational issues such as the teaching of maths and science in English, replacing the primary school evaluations and the lower secondary assessment examinations with school based exams, among others, will also be discussed. The Malaysian Blue-Print on Education (2013 – 2025) will be critically reviewed.

About the Speaker

Professor T. Marimuthu is now an Adjunct Professor at the School of Education and Cognitive Sciences, Asia e University, Kuala Lumpur. He was formerly the Chairman of Asian Institute of Medicine, Science and Technology University in Kedah, Malaysia. Professor Marimuthu obtained his BA (Hons) in Economics from the University of Malaya and his MEd and PhD form the University of Manchester, England. He taught Sociology of Education at the Faculty of Education from 1970 till 1990. During this period he has served as the Deputy Dean of the Faculty, member of the University Senate and Professor of Social Psychology of Education.
In 1990, Professor Marimuthu entered politics and become the member of Parliament for Teluk Kemang in Negeri Sembilan between 1990 till 1995. During this period, he was appointed as the Deputy Minister of Agriculture. He was then elected to the Senate, holding office from 1996 to 2002, and served as the Chairman of the International Relations committee of the Malaysian Parliament. Professor Marimuthu was a Fulbright Scholar at Stanford University, California and the University of Chicago, USA and has been a consultant to various international organisations such as UNESCO, UNICEF and the World Bank. He is the author of several books and articles in the field of sociology of education.
 

 
Comparative and International Research in Education: A CRICE Workshop for Research Students
Michael Crossley, University of Bristol
5 April 2013

CRICE, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
This one day workshop for research students provides an introduction to CRICE, and an opportunity to share research experience and gain feedback on postgraduate/research dissertations. Assistance with dissertation planning will be provided along with advice on comparative research methodology, how to engage more closely with CRICE, and how to increase your chances of publishing your research in leading journals and books.

About the Speaker 

Michael Crossley is Professor of Comparative and International Education, Director of the Research Centre for International and Comparative Studies at the Graduate School of Education, and Director of the Education in Small States Research Group (www.smallstates.net), University of Bristol, UK. He was Editor of the journal Comparative Education from 2004 to 2009 inclusive, and was Chair and Vice Chair of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2000 to 2004. He is a member of the Editorial Board for Comparative Education, the International Journal of Educational Development and Research in Post-compulsory Education, and is Founding Series Editor for the Bristol Papers in Education: Comparative and International Studies (Symposium Books, Oxford). Key research interests relate to: theoretical and methodological scholarship on the future of comparative and international education; the international transfer of educational policy and practice; educational research and evaluation capacity and international development cooperation: and educational development in small states. Professor Crossley has undertaken teaching, research and consultancy work in numerous countries worldwide, and has published widely in the field, including the book, Comparative and International Research in Education: Globalisation, Context and Difference (with Keith Watson) Routledge, 2003. Before moving to the University of Bristol, he was Associate Dean for Planning and Research at the University of Papua New Guinea. In 2005 he was elected as an Academician by the UK Academy for the Social Sciences (AcSS).
 

 

Comparative and International Research in Education: Intellectual Foundations, Methodological Perspectives and CRICE Priorities (for academic staff)
Michael Crossley, University of Bristol
4 April 2013
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
This one day staff research workshop is designed to support academic staff in planning, implementing and publishing comparative and international research in education. Presentations will be given by Professor Michael Crossley from the University of Bristol, UK. Workshop activities designed to support ongoing research planning in CRICE and opportunities for colleagues to gain feedback on their own research and to join in new collaborative activities will be provided.

About the Speaker

Michael Crossley is Professor of Comparative and International Education, Director of the Research Centre for International and Comparative Studies at the Graduate School of Education, and Director of the Education in Small States Research Group (www.smallstates.net), University of Bristol, UK. He was Editor of the journal Comparative Education from 2004 to 2009 inclusive, and was Chair and Vice Chair of the British Association for International and Comparative Education (BAICE) from 2000 to 2004. He is a member of the Editorial Board for Comparative Education, the International Journal of Educational Development and Research in Post-compulsory Education, and is Founding Series Editor for the Bristol Papers in Education: Comparative and International Studies (Symposium Books, Oxford). Key research interests relate to: theoretical and methodological scholarship on the future of comparative and international education; the international transfer of educational policy and practice; educational research and evaluation capacity and international development cooperation: and educational development in small states. Professor Crossley has undertaken teaching, research and consultancy work in numerous countries worldwide, and has published widely in the field, including the book, Comparative and International Research in Education: Globalisation, Context and Difference (with Keith Watson) Routledge, 2003. Before moving to the University of Bristol, he was Associate Dean for Planning and Research at the University of Papua New Guinea. In 2005 he was elected as an Academician by the UK Academy for the Social Sciences (AcSS).

 

Panel discussion on 'Education Policy and Educational Reality: Are They Always the Same Thing?' 
20 March 2013, 15.00- 17.00 
Auditorium, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
Education is culturally embedded but politically delivered. Consequently what is proposed by political authority can change when a policy is enacted.There are a number of reasons for this. One is that the formulation of policy is often guided by the ideological priorities of those on power. They do not always, if at all, take into account the outcomes of educational research or policy analysis by academics. The cultural realities on the ground are often very localised, influenced by historical factors as well as ethnic diversity. In some places indigenous communities maintain, at least to some degree their traditional informal education instead of, or alongside, the modern system of formal education. There is also the urban rural dichotomy. The reality of response to educational reform is highly localised. Many decisions are made at family level. Consequently, for a variety of reasons national policies and reforms may well be mediated at the local level, the level of educational reality.
 

Guest Panellists

 
Shadow Education: Comparative Perspectives on the Spread and Implications of Private Supplementary Tutoring
Mark Bray, University of Hong Kong
20 March 2013, 10.00 - 11.30
Bilik Cemerlang, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
Around the world, millions of pupils take supplementary lessons in academic subjects after school hours. This phenomenon is widely known as shadow education because its content mimics the regular schools: as the curriculum in the regular schools changes, so it changes in the shadow.Shadow education has long been prominent in much of East Asia. In recent decades it has spread not only to the rest of the region, including Malaysia, but also beyond. Viewed positively, shadow education may help slow learners to keep up with their peers, and may stretch further the performance of high achievers. However it also maintains social inequalities, and may have a negative backwash on regular schooling.This lecture will examine the reasons for the global spread of shadow education, and will consider the lessons from comparative analysis. It will include focus on the economic, social and pedagogical dimensions of shadow education, and will draw on a pair of books published by UNECSO in 2009 and Asian Development Bank in 2012.

About the Speaker

Mark Bray is UNESCO Chair Professor in Comparative Education at the University of Hong Kong. He has taught at that University since 1986, prior to which he taught in secondary schools in Kenya and Nigeria and at the Universities of Edinburgh, Papua New Guinea and London. Between 2006 and 2010 he was seconded to Paris to work as Director of UNESCO’s International Institute for Educational Planning (IIEP). Within the University of Hong Kong, Professor Bray is Director of the Comparative Education Research Centre (CERC). He is also a member of the Board of Directors of the Comparative Education Society of Asia (CESA), and past President and Secretary General of the World Council of Comparative Education Societies (WCCES). He is also a former President of the Comparative Education Society of Hong Kong (CESHK). Professor Bray has written extensively in the field of comparative education. He is the author or editor of over 40 books, including ones on methodology of comparative education research and on the economics and financing of education. His work on shadow education has had significant impact at the level of national policies as well as in the research communities of different continents.

 

 

Comparative Education and the Geography of Education
Colin Brock, University of Oxford
19 March 2013, 15.00-16.30

CRICE, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
The discipline of geography and the sub-discipline of educational studies have much in common, especially in spatial terms. Everything in education happens somewhere, and that is always for a reason. Geography is the locational and spatial analysis of anything on the surface of the earth, so this includes schools, colleges and universities. There are reasons why they are located where they are, some of which are historical and some more contemporary. There are also reasons why educational activities have spatial outcomes, for education is to do with the dissemmination of curricula. This could be on a local scale between schools, families and communities, or on a global scale through Information Communications Technology (ICT). So this is not to do with formal education alone, but also informal education and increasingly so.The spatial situation of both geography and education is dynamic, not static. In this presentation examples of this relationship will be given from the UK, USA and Malaysia. 

About the Speaker

Colin Brock is member of the Governing Body of a primary school in England that is linked dynamically with a primary school in Malaysia. He is also a Senior Research Fellow in Comparative and International Education at the University of Oxford, where he has worked since 1992. Before that he was Chair of International Education at the University of Hull, and while there he made his first visit to West Malaysia , Sabah and Sarawak about 30 years ago. More recently he has been assisting Dr Lorraine Symaco of the University of Malaya in her successful effort to establish the Centre for Research in Comparative and International Education (CRICE) at the University of Malaya. Dr Brock is a graduate (BA) in geography and anthrolopogy of the University of Durham, UK. He holds masters degrees in geography (MA) and comparative education (MEd) from Durham and the University of Reading respectively, and a PhD in Geography and Education from the University of Hull, plus an MA from Oxford and an PhD (Honoris Causa) from the Kirovograd State Pedagogical University in Ukraine. He has authored, co-authored or edited about 30 books and written over 100 chapters in books/articles in journals. At the present time he is working with Dr Lorraine Symaco on a Special Edition of the journal Comparative Education on issues of scale, space and place in the study of education.

 

 

Learner-Centred Education in International Perspectives
Michele Schweisfurth, University of Glasgow
19 March 2013, 10.00 - 11.30 
Cemerlang Room, Faculty of Education, University of Malaya
 
Learner-Centred Education (LCE) is a travelling policy, widely promoted by international agencies and national governments. Arguments in favour of this pedagogical tradition refer to theories and evidence from cognitive psychology, claiming that all learners can benefit from it. Beyond the benefits to the individual, however, lie a set of assumptions about learner-centred education as a foundation for the building of democratic citizens and societies, suitable for economies of the future. These promises have been questioned by critics who doubt that it is appropriate in all cultural and resource contexts, and there is considerable evidence in the global South of perennial problems of implementation.This presentation will explore the question of whether in the light of these debates, LCE is still a sound approach to educational development. It will consider LCE as a global phenomenon, LCE in lower and middle-income countries, and what a culturally- and contextually-sensitive approach to LCE might entail.

About the Speaker

Michele Schweisfurth is Professor of Comparative and International Education at the School of Education, University of Glasgow. She is editor of the journal Comparative Education, and a member of the Executive Editorial Board of the International Journal of Educational Development. Until recently, while at the University of Birmingham she was Director of the Centre for International Education and Research. riginally from Canada, she has extensive international experience as a teacher and researcher; among the countries where she has worked are Indonesia, Russia, South Africa, China, and The Gambia. Her research interests include education for democracy, university internationalisation, and global citizenship education, with comparative pedagogy as a theme across them all.
 
 

Contact Details

Centre for Research in International and Comparative Education (CRICE)
Faculty of Education
University of Malaya
Kuala Lumpur 50603, Malaysia,

Tel: +603 7967 5101
Fax: +603 7967 3884
Email:
crice@um.edu.my
GPS: 3.1204585, 101.6524242